The Fantastic Mr. Wilde

The Fantastic Mr. Wilde

18,818 notes

Okay, but it’s not just about getting paid to prance around in a princess costume

cosplaytutorial:

racebentdisney:

amaninyc:

lyrique86:

Let me tell you a story.  Once at a party, I had all the little girls sitting around me and I was asking them about their favorite parts of all the princess movies.  The birthday girl was sitting next to me, and tells me, “Princess, your skin is the same color as mine.”  I smile and agree, and try to move the game along, but she interrupts and says, “Your skin is brown and you’re a princess.  It’s the same color as mine, but you’re a princess.”

“Well, if my skin is brown and your skin is brown, and I’m a princess, then you must be a princess too.” I tell her.  And then I spent the next 10 minutes assuring all the black girls at the party that yes, they have lovely skin and yes, they can be princesses with me.

This happens at most of the parties I go to.  I have had my arm stroked, my hair patted, my skin color commented on more times than I can remember. I am not simply hired out to entertain a bunch of cute little girls dressed in poofy skirts who want to play with a big girl in a poofier skirt.  I am hired out because I am an affirmation. For these little black girls (and boys!  I’ve dazzled a few of them too) Princess Tiana is proof that for once, they can be special BECAUSE of the color of their skin, not IN SPITE OF.

Adding some of her pictures for emphasis.

We’ve featured pictures of this lovely Tiana before, but I wanted to add this post to the blog as well :)

That’s just magical and awesome! :) 

I’m sure kids seeing cosplayers get similar inspiration. That there are princesses and warriors and everything inbetween of all different ages and races out there, and that one day they can be one too. 

(via jumpingjacktrash)

Filed under cosplay

247,548 notes

jumpingjacktrash:

thischick25:

cherrymilkshake:

jumpingjacktrash:

building-an-unstoppable-fist:

poopsandpeeps:

thelonelyscarecrow:

castiels-time-traveler:

nintendocanada:

mapsontheweb:

Map of the World by Natural Skin Color

i’m really dumbfounded that i never realized skin colour is literally just caused by being closer to or farther from the equator and the resulting sun exposure and skin darkening

actually, its an adaptation. natural selection. people with darker skin are selected for in areas near the equator, where the melanin that causes the darker color protects them from radiation and protects them from skin cancer and other health defects, and because they are healthier they can pass on that trait more. people near the poles have lighter skin because it allows them absorb more of the limited sunlight to convert to vitamin d. 

THIS IS THE THING SOME PEOPLE HATE OTHER PEOPLE OVER.Evolution of melanin levels based on geographical location.

Reblogging for the last comment.

second to last comment was dope, and very true.
but for real, is the reason behind skin color really not common knowledge? I mean….

there seems to be some assumption going on that darker skin is the adaptation.
in fact, darker skin is the ‘original flavor’. but evolution likes to get rid of traits that aren’t needed, especially if they cost energy, and maintaining a melanin shield is expensive. we also need sunlight to synthesize vitamin D, and melanin blocks that. so in latitudes that get less sunlight, folks evolved to produce less melanin.
vitamin D deficiency is actually a problem for dark-skinned people living in areas with long, dark winters, btw. take your vitamins!
light-colored eyes are also an adaptation to less sunlight. if real life was like science fiction, blue-eyed people could see in the dark. but reality’s not that cool.

I have trouble seeing in bright light. Idk if that’s because of the blue eyes or because I prefer being inside because I’m super pale and burning sucks.
Brown-eyed followers, do your eyes adjust to bright sunlight, or are you always squinting?

Pretty well, I’d have to say, unless I’m coming out of a relatively dim area (like an office/warehouse) to like, a clear bright sky. Even if I have to squint, I only have to do it enough so I can see through my eyelashes and the adjustment is fairly quick.

i have green/gray eyes and i have a real problem with bright light, especially glare off water/snow. this is all anecdotal, but it occurs to me that if pigmented eyes are a good defense against snow glare, that might explain why, when you reach the snowline, the population’s eye color darkens again.

jumpingjacktrash:

thischick25:

cherrymilkshake:

jumpingjacktrash:

building-an-unstoppable-fist:

poopsandpeeps:

thelonelyscarecrow:

castiels-time-traveler:

nintendocanada:

mapsontheweb:

Map of the World by Natural Skin Color

i’m really dumbfounded that i never realized skin colour is literally just caused by being closer to or farther from the equator and the resulting sun exposure and skin darkening

actually, its an adaptation. natural selection. people with darker skin are selected for in areas near the equator, where the melanin that causes the darker color protects them from radiation and protects them from skin cancer and other health defects, and because they are healthier they can pass on that trait more. people near the poles have lighter skin because it allows them absorb more of the limited sunlight to convert to vitamin d. 

THIS IS THE THING SOME PEOPLE HATE OTHER PEOPLE OVER.

Evolution of melanin levels based on geographical location.

Reblogging for the last comment.

second to last comment was dope, and very true.

but for real, is the reason behind skin color really not common knowledge? I mean….

there seems to be some assumption going on that darker skin is the adaptation.

in fact, darker skin is the ‘original flavor’. but evolution likes to get rid of traits that aren’t needed, especially if they cost energy, and maintaining a melanin shield is expensive. we also need sunlight to synthesize vitamin D, and melanin blocks that. so in latitudes that get less sunlight, folks evolved to produce less melanin.

vitamin D deficiency is actually a problem for dark-skinned people living in areas with long, dark winters, btw. take your vitamins!

light-colored eyes are also an adaptation to less sunlight. if real life was like science fiction, blue-eyed people could see in the dark. but reality’s not that cool.

I have trouble seeing in bright light. Idk if that’s because of the blue eyes or because I prefer being inside because I’m super pale and burning sucks.

Brown-eyed followers, do your eyes adjust to bright sunlight, or are you always squinting?

Pretty well, I’d have to say, unless I’m coming out of a relatively dim area (like an office/warehouse) to like, a clear bright sky. Even if I have to squint, I only have to do it enough so I can see through my eyelashes and the adjustment is fairly quick.

i have green/gray eyes and i have a real problem with bright light, especially glare off water/snow. this is all anecdotal, but it occurs to me that if pigmented eyes are a good defense against snow glare, that might explain why, when you reach the snowline, the population’s eye color darkens again.

Filed under science evolution